Patients…observe, understand, plan THEN respond!

Patience – WHEW! A difficult paradox to master. To me, patients aren’t a “thing” but more it understanding. Patience is the ability to observe, understand, plan THEN respond.

See what had happen was -I kind of got myself in a pickle! I had a huge “dog” back in Feb 06. I consulted my brother and we agreed that it was something that could be taken care of. So far so good – observation – check!

I understood the “dog” was a responsibility of macro proportions. We knew it would be extremely difficult to accomplish but well worth the effort once the reward was reaped. Because the “dog” was in my care the bulk and primary part of the decisions was mine to make along with the financial aspect of such. Understanding – uh kind of…

I “thought” I had a plan. I knew the “dog” would be “x” big, require “x” food, and “x” resources. The plan I conceded required ALL of the existing resources I had available to me – including personal ones. Plan – sure IF nothing goes wrong or as long as my “dog” acts right and Murphy’s Law is not in effect.

I think you know where I am going – the “dog” wasn’t acting right (so I thought – it was just the nature of the dog), so I had the brilliant idea to get a another “dog”. This one is a puppy and I groomed her from a baby. The problem is I only had a set amount of dog food – so I borrowed food from my first “dog” to help groom and nurture my new puppy. My thoughts were that if I had two “dogs” they would keep each other in line.

The first “dog” is now ill and on the verge of expiring because of all of the harm I caused her. In retrospect I should have entertained and observed a full fiscal cycle with the first “dog” before I got the other. Responded – yea smooth move ex-lax, should have waited!!

With all of that said I now have two “dogs” to feed. They require “x” food per month and I cannot afford to keep them. The younger “dog” is on the verge of becoming a beautiful pedigree and my first “dog” would be ok if I could just stabilize her diet…however if I cannot get the required food, they will both soon perish.

Well as you can see, I observed, I understood (kind of), planned (based on shaky understanding) and responded too quickly. Yea patients/understanding is a commodity and should be harnessed and yielded whenever possible. Now I have to try and “fix” this problem and still keep the “dogs” alive. (sigh)

I am beside myself and in dismay at my response to my first dog, and now I am perplexed as to how to keep them all inline and alive.

Wish me luck!

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3 thoughts on “Patients…observe, understand, plan THEN respond!

  1. You parallel having a dog with being in a pickle? Interesting perspective. Having a dog is very much like having a child…I’ve experienced both. A dog requires the obvious food and water as with all living objects. Further, they require nurture — which demands resources — time, care, patience and guidance. Exactly like parenting. To bring another living thing in to our lives necessitates clear vision and commitment, its an investment of love and resources. Hope the ending was positive and serves to guide your next ‘experiment’.

  2. Ah…well the dog and the pickle weren’t being compared or paralleled. I was IN a pickle b/c I was losing my “dog”. The vegetable was a term to describe the peril I was facing with my “dog”.

    The reference of “dog” was used figuratively in respect to my retail stores.

    dog = stores
    food = money

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data, ability to repeat discredited memes, and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Also, be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor even implied. Any irrelevancies you can mention will also be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous :)

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